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Posted on in Tax Rants

Maybe I’m showing my age, but I recall the “reinvention” of the Internal Revenue Service following the nasty Senate hearings in 1998.   

This was before 9/11, when our government’s problems were consistent with a simpler, less troubled time.  For those of you who weren’t of age at the time to care about such things, or perhaps weren’t even inhabiting this planet yet, these hearings were a big deal.  The Tax Collector was put on trial, and the proceedings televised to the nation – the IRS’ Watergate.  Current employees provided testimony behind curtains with masked voices like the adults in Charlie Brown cartoons.  Taxpayers complained bitterly about the “Gestapo-like” tactics of aggressive Revenue Officers and Special (criminal) Agents. 

The aftermath?  Our government’s procurement of a million dollar consultant study analyzing the structural and other problems with the IRS bureaucracy.  The study led to some new legislation – the third, but most significant ever, Taxpayer Bill of Rights.  Also, the IRS reorganized itself, and rolled-out a functionally (rather than geographically) based bureaucracy, while at the same time publicly dedicating itself to improved customer relations and a responsive, educating, client-servicing agency.   The “New” IRS. 

Tax Lien filings and levies dropped significantly in the wake of the roll-out.  Seizures were dramatically reduced and, in part due to the new protective legislation requiring a district court order, the taking of residences to satisfy tax debts all but disappeared entirely from the IRS Collection toolbox.

Shortly thereafter, the offer in compromise program criteria were liberalized, so instead of a 95% plus rejection rate, more and more taxpayers started realizing the “fresh start” promised by the alternative.   And the government reportedly reduced its receivables significantly, making it more resemble a business.  Good for everybody. 

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litigation hazard, tax appeals, Chicago Tax Attorneys"A fair and impartial resolution is one which reflects on an issue-by-issue basis the probable result in event of litigation, or one which reflects mutual concessions for the purpose of settlement based on relative strength of the opposing positions where there is substantial uncertainty of the result in event of litigation." - Internal Revenue Manual section 8.6.1.3(2). When you've sent a Letter of Appeal to the IRS asking for an administrative review of a decision that was made by the Examination function regarding your tax dispute, the IRS assigns an Appeals Officer to determine of there is a possibility for settling the issue. The mission of the Appeals Officer is to resolve your case in a way that:

  • Avoids litigation;
  • Is "fair and impartial";
  • Will encourage voluntary compliance;
  • Represents the integrity and efficiency of the IRS.

Because the Appeals Officer's mission explicitly includes the objective of avoiding litigation, they'll generally begin the discussion by going over the various ways in which you could settle out-of-court by reaching a compromise that fully embraces any hazards to the government of litigating the issue.

Hazards of Litigation Defined 

What the Appeals Officer is actually determining is a quantitative analysis of:

  • The likelihood that, if the case goes to Tax Court on the liability issues, what are the chances the government will prevail, and what are the chances that the taxpayer will prevail.
  • The cost of litigation to the government is simply not an issue.

Application of the Hazards of Litigation Standard

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tax help, LITC, Chicago Tax LawyersLow Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) is exactly what it sounds like; a place where people with IRS disputes who cannot afford a private tax lawyer's fees can go to get the help they need for no charge. If they qualify, these taxpayers can get assistance with IRS (and related state) audits, appeals, collections and tax litigation. LITCs are also frequently resourced for taxpayers who speak little to no English, and in some locations for those who communicate primarily or exclusively through sign language.

Who Pays For LITCs?

The Federal Government provides a matching grant (up to $100,000) for each dollar spent by the LITC in its normal operations.  The grant is administered by the Taxpayer Advocate Service of the IRS.

Can You Use The Services of a Low Income Taxpayer Clinic?

Basically, you have to have an active dispute with the IRS, and have gross household income below the annually-established threshold.  This threshold is specifically set at 250% of the government established poverty level. Currently, this means:

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